Kimchi & Dals & the Comfort of Daily Habits

Many Koreans eat kimchi, the fermented cabbage and/or root dish everyday, with-or in most meals. Dals, the split lentils, peas or beans cooked into a savory stew with spices, grace tables over all over Southeast Asia, particularly Indian, Pakistan, and Bangladesh and are often simply enjoyed with rice–a protein rich, inexpensive meal. I am interested in these cultural/culinary traditions, in part because of their daily cons... Read more »

Peanut Noodles (and Kimchi)

...the lime juice and the raw veggies. If you have leftover chicken floating around or some shrimp in the freezer it would be even heartier but it’s pretty substantial as is. My first batch of Kimchi. There is a thriving “pickle scene” in Portland evidenced by the number of vendors of all things pickled and fermented at our many farmers’ markets, the pickle plates on restaurant menus, and at not-to-be-miss... Read more »

Recipes

...use all that lettuce Herbs: parsley salsa verde (video tutorial & recipe), green sauce for any tender herb (dill, cilantro, basil, parsley, etc.), 15 different pestos Recipes that use a lot of something: sauteed cabbage, leek, cabbage & white bean soup w/ herb stems, parsnip & parsley hash, kale pesto, braised greens, vegetable ragouts, roasted winter squash & onions w/ tahini lemon sauce, onion tart, cabbage pancakes. Preserve... Read more »

Savory Breakfast Fun

...syrup and any kind of cooked bean (or grain) provides the heft. My usual greenery (parsley and/or cilantro and scallions) is key and a little diced radish, carrot, kohlrabi or something else crunchy is nice. You could toss in kimchi or capers or any kind of pickles really. . .   Of course this would make a nice lunch too. However and whenever you might consume something like this, enjoy! And a healthy and happy New Year t... Read more »

Recipe New Look Test

Kimchi & Dals & the Comfort of Daily Habits

Many Koreans eat kimchi, the fermented cabbage and/or root dish everyday, with-or in most meals. Dals, the split lentils, peas or beans cooked into a savory stew with spices, grace tables over all over Southeast Asia, particularly Indian, Pakistan, and Bangladesh and are often simply enjoyed with rice–a protein rich, inexpensive meal. I am interested in these cultural/culinary traditions, in part because of their daily consumption (with plenty of variation). There are certainly things I eat regularly and I am…

Peanut Noodles (and Kimchi)

…the lime juice and the raw veggies. If you have leftover chicken floating around or some shrimp in the freezer it would be even heartier but it’s pretty substantial as is. My first batch of Kimchi. There is a thriving “pickle scene” in Portland evidenced by the number of vendors of all things pickled and fermented at our many farmers’ markets, the pickle plates on restaurant menus, and at not-to-be-missed annual Portland Fermentation Festival that alas I have always missed!…

Recipes

…use all that lettuce Herbs: parsley salsa verde (video tutorial & recipe), green sauce for any tender herb (dill, cilantro, basil, parsley, etc.), 15 different pestos Recipes that use a lot of something: sauteed cabbage, leek, cabbage & white bean soup w/ herb stems, parsnip & parsley hash, kale pesto, braised greens, vegetable ragouts, roasted winter squash & onions w/ tahini lemon sauce, onion tart, cabbage pancakes. Preserve some of your produce: Pickles, Pickled Jalapenos & Carrots (Escabeche), Kimchi, Roasted…

Savory Breakfast Fun

…syrup and any kind of cooked bean (or grain) provides the heft. My usual greenery (parsley and/or cilantro and scallions) is key and a little diced radish, carrot, kohlrabi or something else crunchy is nice. You could toss in kimchi or capers or any kind of pickles really. . .   Of course this would make a nice lunch too. However and whenever you might consume something like this, enjoy! And a healthy and happy New Year to you all!…