Oh Yes!

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Deviled Eggs with Sidewalk Greens

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Less Shopping, More Chopping!

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Delicious Gifts & a Hazelnut Honey Tart

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Scraps, Leftovers, Odd Bits. . . and How to Use What We Have

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Mustard Greens & Broccoli & a Survey

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Apple Pie

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Gratitude

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Good Soup on the Fly

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Seven Years of Learning and Cooking with You All!

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Oh Yes!

spaghetti aglio olio

I recently discovered Communal Table. The first post I received has been resonating with me on many levels–it was a welcome note to 2016 and talked about mindfulness and playfulness and food, of course, and included this inimitable line: “I don’t need someone else’s piousness moving in and making way too many kale & quinoa protein shakes, thank you very much. I am fully capable of eating a chocolate marshmallow-filled doughnut in January and still having good moral values.”

Author (and creator of Communal Table) Adrian Hale not only curates this beautiful site/community but bakes dark, whole grain breads that take me back to my childhood in Germany and loves vegetables as much as I do. I don’t even like marshmallows but the sentiment rings true. I crave vegetables and fresh food as much as the next after the holiday overload (always in fact) but let’s not take the ease and fun out of food and especially, let’s let the judgement go.

And with that, let’s have a big bowl of pasta for dinner where the only vegetable in site is the parsley, albeit quite a bit of it. Of course I did want (and had) a salad to go with it.

Spaghetti Aglio, Olio, Peperoncino

I’ve made this for years but was reminded of it by this recent post from Elizabeth Minchilli in Rome.

Serves 4

2 tablespoons olive oil
4-5 cloves garlic, minced
4 anchovies, finely chopped (optional but even anchovy skeptics tend to like this dish and they melt completely so are unidentifiable at the table but add such depth.)
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes or if you have them, 1/2 tsp or more crumbled Calabrian dried peperoncino peppers or minced, dried Joe’s Long Cayenne or Ring of Fire peppers
1 lb spaghetti
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley
Salt and freshly ground pepper
Good olive oil, for serving

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add more salt (like 2+ tablespoons) than you think necessary. Cook the pasta until al dente.

While the spaghetti is cooking heat the olive oil in a large skillet, that will later accommodate all the pasta, over medium heat. Add the garlic and anchovies and stir constantly for about 3 minutes until the garlic is fragrant. Mash the anchovies and garlic up a bit while you stir.

Drain the pasta and add to the pan with the garlic and anchovies, stir to coat and cook for a minute or two. Stir in the parsley, freshly ground pepper and a bit more of your best olive oil. Serve at once.

 

 

Deviled Eggs with Sidewalk Greens

deviled eggs w weeds

A recent last minute request for deviled eggs, which I usually make with lots of herbs, presented yet another opportunity to NOT go to the store. I stepped out my back door and found lots of pop weed, aka Hairy Bittercress, a few puny parsley sprigs, a little marjoram and thyme.  I wrote about Hairy Bittercress in my very first blog post and it remains noteworthy.

Loathed by farmers and many gardeners it is a quickly spreading pest that is best removed before it goes to seed and its seeds “pop” and explode everywhere. However, in January when you need something fresh, green and spicy to add to salads, soups, or deviled eggs, it is a welcome weed.

Hairy BittercressStep outside and look around the sidewalk crevices or little muddy patches along a garden path and you will likely find it, if you live in a climate that is temperate and damp in the winter.

Most any other spicy/peppery green or herb will work beautifully in rich deviled eggs. Finely chop arugula, mint, watercress. . . .and stir into the yolk mixture.

deviled egg w weeds prep II

Deviled Eggs with Bittercress and  Herbs

6 eggs
2 teaspoons Dijon-style mustard
3 tablespoons mayonnaise
3 tablespoons finely chopped Hairy Bittercress (or other spicy green, see above)
2 teaspoons chopped fresh parsley, marjoram, cilantro, etc.
Salt and freshly ground pepper

Cover eggs generously with cold water and bring to a boil. As soon as the water is boiling turn off the heat. For eggs where you want the yolk firm but not dry, as for deviled eggs,leave in hot water for 10-11 minutes depending on the size of the eggs. Drain and fill pot with cold water to stop cooking. (For eggs that have solid yolks but have a slightly creamier interior to use in salads, Salad Nicoise, etc. take out of hot water after 8-9 minutes.)

Peel eggs and slice eggs in half lengthwise. Scoop out yolks and put into a bowl. Mash with a fork and add the remainder of the ingredients until well mixed. Adjust seasoning to your liking. Fill mixture back into egg halves with a teaspoon. Decorate with a bit of the chopped herbs if you like.

Less Shopping, More Chopping!

2 radishes, 1/2 a fennel bulb, 2 small carrots, some cilantro, plus plenty of lime juice, salt, a little oil. This finely chopped garnish enabled us to have leftover black beans and rice (from the freezer–I always make more than I need in the moment) for dinner. Simple, fresh, filling […] Read more »

Mustard Greens & Broccoli & a Survey

These are the green bits of inspiration I’ve had all week thanks to my neighborhood farmers’ market. I document all these experiments as I continue to improve my Seasonal Recipe Collection to provide a deep, beautiful resource to anyone who likes to cook, wants to cook more, eat more vegetables, get out of […] Read more »

Apple Pie

Pumpkin takes center stage, as does pecan typically but good old apple pie holds its own on any festive table. Mix and match whatever apples you might have on hand, toss in a pear or a quince, or stir in 1/2 cup of apricot jam and watch as people gasp and […] Read more »

Good Soup on the Fly

You never know when that cup of cooked beans or chunk of roasted butternut squash will come in handy. Little time to think about what to make for dinner and little time to actually make it? How does one turn random bits of already cooked ingredients into something delicious? Yesterday’s example […] Read more »

Seven Years of Learning and Cooking with You All!

Seven years ago this week I taught two classes in my home kitchen to a handful of you. Then I taught a series of classes at Zenger Farm to a dozen of you. And I bought the url cookwithwhatyouhave.com and the rest is history, I suppose. I set out to spread the […] Read more »